Going through old photos I found these.   It was one year ago today! My camera takes such terrible gig pics I thought I would have some fun taking some  shots after the show  during the load out. It brought back a lot of memories of the old days, before I really started going backstage when I was just a kid, waiting around outside, hoping to meet a star!

There was a great vibe outside. loads of energy and fun! Maybe you will even see yourself there!

It was  quite a show, starting off with  a howl with Hello There by Cheap Trick and never let up for a moment!

I had just seen Todd do one  of the  first few nights of this show and it was so fantastic. They were just pulling the show together  so It was  more like being at a rehearsal  or recording session rather than at a “proper ” normal” gig ! To say I was as loose  as Great- Aunt Fannies panties at midnight after too much hard cider at the hoedown on Saturday night would be an understatement! But i have never laughed so hard in my life at a concert.  And I mean that in the nicest possible way!

https://shinyhappysherry.wordpress.com/2014/10/29/getting-to-todd-rundgren-at-the-birchmere/

But this Post is all about the pics  so let me get right to them!

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5th Oct 1946, Born on this day, Gram Parsons, US singer, songwriter. Member of The International Submarine Band, The Byrds, Flying Burrito Brothers. Released the 1973 solo album ‘Grievous Angel.’ Parsons died under mysterious conditions in Joshua Tree, California on 19th September 1973 from a heroin overdose aged 26. Read one of the strangest stories in rock here: http://www.thisdayinmusic.com/pages/gram_parsons

I’ll admit, I’ve been a Chicago stalker since 1993. Ok, maybe stalker is a little harsh. Follower? Fan? By no means a groupie. I have never been backstage, although I would have given my left arm to ogle Bill Champlin in the flesh and get a pic with him.

Something about those horn-blaring, keyboard-playing, sexy older dudes rocking classic tunes just made my heart pump and pulse quicken. Now, 22 years later, I still get a rush when I watch them on stage.

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Have I gone mad? my mother used to ask me, when I was a kid of 16. As a hazel-eyed, precocious, dreamer of a girl who spent her Sunday nights glued to the radio for Casey Kasem’s Countdown of the Top 20 Hits in the land, I was a certified odd duck. While other girls were out cruising in cars in boys, going to raves or bush parties, and lighting blunts, I was in my room like the perfect little Bible thumping, goody two-shoes, penning her romance novels, aka Danielle Steel style and shrieking when Cetera came on the radio with a ’70s or ’80s classic like Old Days or You’re The Inspiration.

No, Mommie Dearest, I did not lose my marbles. I simply found a band that spiked my heart rate better than any Stones or washed up rock band could do. All the other girls worshiped Kurt Cobain or Brad Pitt, but I had the image of Peter Cetera plastered all over the walls of my tiny room. She panicked, thinking I was going to run off to Idaho and find him.

When I discovered Cetera had left in 1985, I was bummed out, to say the least. But then, in June 1993, I decided to take a shot at seeing the boys in concert at a tiny pavilion called the Ontario Place Forum in Toronto. I spent six weeks cutting grass on the one acre spread at home, and my dad paid me a meager $15 a week. It was the Chicago concert, though, come hell or high water!!

There is a point to this rambling. And I will get to it. The band’s review is here, beneath the plethora of gushing. I promise.

From that pleasant first night of summer, June 21, 1993, I was hooked on Jason and the boys. That was when Mister Scheff wore those black sleeveless shirts, flaunting his huge biceps and adorable mop top of curls. Bill had that sexy growl, black leather vest and long silver hair in a poni-tail. Robert wore black spandex pants and a big purple shirt, hair in a blunt cut just grazing the shoulder.

Over the years, the guys from the Windy City have never let me down. Each show, mainly in the Toronto area, was fantastic. Back in the ’90s, they played Kingswood Music Theatre at Canada’s Wonderland or Casina Rama. Each time, my mother groaned, fussed, argued, and tried to come against my passion for “those old men again. When are you gonna grow out of this phase and give it up?” All the while, her condescending words fell on deaf ears. My sister and I got on that GO bus and headed for the show. I’m a stubborn Taurus, so I usually get my way. Miss a once-a-year show to see my boys? I’d rather die.

Fast forward to 2015. Now, with a new vocalist and keyboard player replacing Champlin, I wasn’t keen on hearing him sing. After all, I’d been spoiled by Jason and Bill singing “Hard Habit To Break” with that perfect blend of harmonies. The smokey, blues tone of Bill and the Cetera-esque vocals of Jason. How could a fill-in possibly emulate that?

Soon enough, I would find out I was wrong. I needed to give the “new guy” a chance. Who was I to judge this Lou Pardini character, anyways? I hadn’t heard a single note he ever sung. Come off it, girl. Just swallow your pride.

Earth, Wind and Fire were on double-billing with the boys. This was going to be a big deal!! Earlier in the week, I was stoked to be caller #7 on the local radio station CKDO when Chris Coppin answered the phone and asked: “CKDO…who is this?” I remember jumping up and down, shrieking, because for the life of me, I’d never won tickets to see my favorite band. For years, I’d spent piles of money on the tickets, never having the thrill of winning them for free. Here now was the moment, and I couldn’t be happier.

My sister and I arrived at the gig early.

11911513_10153259193208732_1257000067_n The lineup was huge. No one was let through the main gates til 6:40 p.m., and when finally, we all started milling through, I could feel my anxiety rising. Dammit, get me to the Keg pavilion pronto! You see, just that afternoon at 2:00 p.m., I was stoked to hear from The Keg restaurant on twitter.

They’d seen my Chicago-tagged tweet from the night before, stating how excited I was to see Jason and the boys. The Keg sent me a private message: “We’ll be there, too, Rochelle. Tell us the number of people in your group, and we’ll have complimentary drinks and food for everyone on the house.”

All I remember was running out of the house with fire in my heels and amped to the max to get to that concert. Free tickets to my favorite band AND free drinks and food? The gods must be smiling on me!!What the hell was happening with my karma lately?It seemed to be on steroids.

Finally, arriving at the venue, having some drinks and SUPERB appetizers, we all mingled with a small crowd. We were given laminated passes to wear around our necks. Sauntering around with food in one hand and a drink in the other, I was right in my glory.

Chicago came onto the stage around 7:45 p.m. The crowd went wild. They started the show with “Beginnings,” their classic hit from the early part of their career. Robert sounded smooth as ever. I watched him on the jumbo screen and turned to my sister. “Does that man never age? Look at that full head of hair. He’s 70 but looks 55.”

All the guys dress so well. Stylish jeans and a dark blazer, mostly. All sexy, all perfect eye candy for the ladies in the crowd. Something happens to a Chicago fan when we witness the guys come to the stage. There’s a collective moment of awe, then the cheering erupts. The chill through the body. The heart rate elevated. Our mood spikes, we become one with each other, all 16,000 of us.

This concert rocked my socks. Every song was pure magic, people grooving, dancing, laughing. Happy faces flooded the crowd and the joy that spread through that place was phenomenal.

The show ran about 3 hours and was well worth every penny. No bad review here. What else can I say? The weather was perfect, 18c/64f, not a cloud in site. The Full Moon shone in a cloudless sky, and the boats dotted the harbour over pristine Lake Ontario.

Jason and the guys covered all their big hits like “Make Me Smile” and “25 or 6 to 4,” and sang their hearts out. When Mr. Scheff belted out the classic “Street Player,” I shrieked with delight. It’s thrilling to hear the band revisit some old hits that were not previously covered in the set. I’ve heard over the years that they really love their fans. There’s no such thing as a bad Chicago performance, and I’ll vouch for that.

So when the new guy on keyboards came out and rocked the keys with his blond-streaked hair, black vest, white shirt and black pants, I was a believer. Gone was Champlin and his signature growl, but in his place was a soulful crooner named Lou Pardini.

At the risk of sounding weird, I’ll confess I have a thing for Mr. Lou. Besides, what’s not to love? Slick vocals, killer style and sex appeal that makes any hot-blooded woman from age 35-55 swoon with lust. Okay, okay. I’m being a little extra, but you get the picture.

Moral of the story, my boys did the show justice. They gave us a stellar performance, and made us proud of their 48 years of fantastic music. We came, we saw, we drank, we ate, we swooned. The band conquered.

By the end of the night, this tired little Chicago fan crawled into bed exhausted, yet fulfilled. Happy and sated, because my head was ringing with Robert crooning the words to Dialogue Part 1 & 2.

The last thing I remember was putting a clip of Lou on my smartphone, belting out “Call On Me” from the Montreal concert in 2012. Then I fell into a deep, satisfying slumber, with visions of hot older guys dancing in my head.

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Rochelle Renee: BIO

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http://www.amazon.com/Rochelle-Renee/e/B00TKVRAXK/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_3?qid=1441108644&sr=8-3

Born in a small town in Southern Ontario, Rochelle was writing by the age of 7. Her love of short stories graduated to novels at age 14. First, young adult equestrian stories, and later, adult romance. Her biggest writing influences are Lucy Maud Montgomery, Nora Roberts, and Danielle Steel. She is passionate about music and slates the band Chicago as her all time favorite. With five novels under her belt, Rochelle can be found burning the candle at both ends well into the night. She shares her century home with a teenage daughter, guinea pig and loveable Schnoodle named Shiloh. Rochelle writes about the healing power of love and hasn’t given up hope that her prince is out there waiting. She is a journalism graduate and holds a history/sociology degree.

“Sky Pilot” is a 1968 song by Eric Burdon & The Animals, released on the album The Twain Shall Meet. When released as a single the song was split across both sides, due to its length (7:27). As “Sky Pilot (Parts 1 & 2)” it reached number 14 on the U.S. pop charts and number 15 on the Canadian RPM chart.The Sky Pilot of the title is a military chaplain, as revealed by the opening verse:
He blesses the boys, As they stand in line…The smell of gun grease… And the bayonets they shine…He’s there to help them…All that he canTo make them… feel wanted…He’s a good holy man

The line-up includes Eric Burdon on lead vocals, Vic Briggs on guitar, John Weider on guitar and electric violin, Danny McCulloch on bass guitar, and Barry Jenkins on drums.

The song is a balladic slice of life story about a chaplain who blesses a body of troops just before they set out on an overnight raid or patrol, and then retires to await their return.
“Sky Pilot” is organized into three movements: an introduction, a programmatic interlude, and a conclusion.
The introduction begins with the verse quoted above, sung a cappella and solo by Eric Burdon. Thereafter the band joins in with instruments for the chorus. Several verse-chorus iterations follow, leaving the story with the “boys” gone to battle and the Sky Pilot retired to his bed. The verses are musically lean, dominated by the vocal and a pulsing bass guitar, with a strummed acoustic guitar and drum mixed in quietly.
The interlude starts as a guitar solo, but the guitar is quickly submerged under a montage of battle sounds.

First come the sounds of an airstrike; then the airstrike and rock band fade into the sounds of shouting, gunfire, and bagpipes. Near the end of the interlude the battle sounds fade, briefly leaving the bagpipes playing alone before the third movement begins. The bagpipe music is a covert recording of the pipers of the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards playing “All The Bluebonnets Are Over The Border”, captured by Burdon while performing at a school.

He received an angry letter from the UK government (or possibly the Crown) over his use of the recording in the song. 

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I refuse to believe it ! Lemmy is clearly indestructible!  He proved it to me the day we found ourselves trapped in an extremely small pitch black coat closet, all alone, for over three hours.  As you do.

Under extremely “stressful” circumstances. Any lessor men would have puked all over the front row and/or passed out, died or even (shudder) given in and checked into REHAB! Rather than perform immediately after the following events!

It all began when he quite cleverly lured me into a 3 by 3 foot janitors mop closet in a remote area of the backstage using only a mirror and a cheeky wink. Knowing young girls are naturally attracted to bright shiny objects I was helpless to do anything but follow. After squeezing our way in and having a lovely time for a half  hour or so  considering we  only  had a hand mirror to keep us amused ( even though we were completely unable to move at all as it was about the size of an average phone booth)  Unfortunately,  the woman he had flown in at great expense from very far away for that evenings gig eventually discovered our whereabouts and began to scream , pound and kick  the door with all her might and intended to do so until we emerged, which was clearly an extremely bad idea under the circumstances. We whispered and giggled and did the only thing we had room to do. Continue to play with our mirror. The first few hours were tremendously entertaining and enjoyable. Hour three with no apparent relief or rescue party in sight or destined to appear, were not so much. But one had to admire her strength, determination and stamina! Eventually as it became closer and closer to show time a search party was dispatched and at long last we were found! She was ejected from the premises and we were free!  If he could perform after that he is clearly immortal. I couldn’t sleep for four days. LONG LIVE LEMMY!

http://classicrock.teamrock.com/news/2015-04-26/motorhead-cancel-brazil-show-as-lemmy-takes-ill
Motorhead were forced to cancel an appearance in Brazil after frontman Lemmy took ill. Motorhead are scheduled to play in Curitiba, Brazil, on Tuesday (April 28) and in Porto Alegre, also in Brazil, on Thursday (April 30). It is not yet clear whether Lemmy will be fit for the shows.

The singer/bass player had to pull out of Saturday’s scheduled appearance at Monsters Of Rock in Arena Anhembi, Sao Paulo, as he was struck down with stomach problems and dehydration.

Lemmy is undergoing tests in hospital and Motorhead’s slot was filled by a jam session involving guitarist Phil Campbell and drummer Mikkey Dee along with guests including Andreas Kisser and Derrick Green of Sepultura.

In a statement, festival organisers say: “Monsters Of Rock regrets to inform the public that Motorhead will not be able to carry out the performance scheduled for tonight.

“The lead singer Ian ‘Lemmy’ Kilmister, this morning suffered a serious gastric disorder, followed by dehydration. Lemmy has already had tests and been initially medicated, but on medical orders is unable to be present.”

Lemmy spent much of 2013 recuperating from a series of health setbacks which included several weeks in hospital after he suffered internal bleeding. He’d earlier been fitted with a defibrillator to deal with heart problems.

In October 2014, he revealed how he was “close to death” during his last round of surgery. The health worries forced him to clean up his lifestyle.

Judas Priest and Ozzy Osbourne are also on the bill for Monsters Of Rock.

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